The Foxy Merkins

The Foxy Merkins
Esprimi il tuo giudizio
Aggiungi ai preferiti
  • Tendenza LGBT LLL
  • Media voti utenti
    • (0 voti)
  • Critica
Guarda il trailer Varie

Cast

The Foxy Merkins

Dall’autrice di “Codependent Lesbian Space Alien Seeks Same” un’altra divertente e dissacrante commedia lesbica che fa il verso ai tanti film sulla prostituzione maschile (prendendoli un po’ in giro), mettendo al centro della storia due prostitute lesbiche. Un’avventura metropolitana che senza voler essere scandalosa è comunque sovversiva, struggente e fantastica. Margaret è una prostituta, non sappiamo se suo malgrado o per sua fortuna, che si sta addestrando sulla strada quando incontra Jo, una donna bella e sicura di sè, proveniente da una famiglia benestante, esperta nel soddisfare il genere femminile anche se lei si considera una orgogliosa eterosessuale. Il film segue entrambe nelle loro avventura in strada, dove incontrano seduttrici dalla voce roca, casalinghe che mercanteggiano sul prezzo, ipocrite donne conservatrici, venditori di accessori erotici e scambisti maniaci dello shopping. Navigando tra i bizzarri feticci e le stravaganti richieste sessuali dei loro incontri, comprendiamo l’esilarante e patetica differenza tra le due donne e le varie persone che condividono la loro strada solamente per qualche ora.

Condividi

Commenta


trailer: The Foxy Merkins

Varie

Two lesbian hookers wind their way through a world of bargain-hunting housewives and double-dealing conservative women in this buddy comedy, an homage to and riff on iconic male hustler films. Margaret is a down-on-her-luck hooker in training, who meets up with Jo, a beautiful and self-assured grifter from a wealthy family and an expert on servicing women, even as she considers herself proudly heterosexual. The film follows their adventures together on the street, through encounters with husky-voiced seductresses, mumbling erotic accessory salesmen and shopaholic swingers. Navigating the bizarre fetishes and sexual needs of their ‘dates’ brings into focus the hilarious and pathetic disparity between the two hookers, fellow travelers who will share the road together but only for a while. (Imdb)

CRITICA:

The Foxy Merkins (2013) is a film that revels in its very awkward brand of humour. Madeleine Olnek, the director of past Inside Out festival favourite Codependent Lesbian Space Alien Seeks Same (2011), presents a spin on the male hustler movie with this depiction of the lesbian sex trade. Nervous Margaret (Lisa Haas) is new to the streets, but hopes to become an expert with the help of a new friend, the experienced lesbian prostitute Jo (Jackie Monahan). This film depicts a world that may not exist in quite this manner, but taps into the kind of uncomfortable humour to which many can relate.
Olnek’s work benefits from a witty screenplay that comes through in spite of a few wooden deliveries. The two lead actresses are at their best when they are interacting with each other, and both come across as likeable and entertaining. Margaret and Jo may have differing feelings towards each other, but their chemistry is that of two dry humoured friends with great comedic timing. The occasional use of “mockumentary” style filming adds an interesting aspect to the film as well.
The Foxy Merkins is a film that aims to entertain. It is difficult not to laugh at the utter absurdity of some of these situations, rendering the comedy effective. Charming and well-meaning leads add to an experience that may not be cinematically ground breaking, but certainly is fun. Voto 7/10. (Talia C., theartsguild.com)

—————

The Foxy Merkins is both striking in title as it is in premise. Two homeless lesbian prostitutes befriend each other and become partners in making some cash. The story centers on the misadventures specifically of the chubby Margaret (Lisa Haas) as she deals with many suitors that result in comedic moments ranging from foreplay to a strange movie theater date. As a whole, the film is a series of bits strung together with ranging degrees of success. While at times a little too repetitive, the film manages to give its characters heart in the moments in between.
Margaret lives the typical homeless life as she sleeps in public bathrooms and hangs out with Jo (Jackie Monahan), who teaches her on how to build confidence. The moments that click are the ones when this unassuming pair are left wandering the streets of New York and sharing strange stories, including a subplot involving Margaret’s family. There’s plenty of twists regarding character dynamics in the third act, though it lays on the dramatic impact a little too thick.
At times, the film feels a little unfocused on its tone. For a single scene, it turns into a documentary, interviewing real former lesbian prostitutes. The moment is novel, setting an interesting tone that hybrids real life commentary with the fictional story. While it helps to establish back story, it is never addressed again and ends up feeling a little off with the rest of the thematic elements. The interviews also keep the film from feeling either purposeful or just for laughs. The end product doesn’t address lesbian prostitution in any eventful way that makes this one scene hold impact. It is a little unfocused and while often funny, does feel meandering.
The lead performers however have great chemistry with Lisa Haas being selfless in her physical comedy. Jackie Monahan is equally fun as she dispenses advice with a calm and cool demeanor that becomes the backbone to the duo’s chemistry. Alex Karpovsky adds an odd yet wonderful bit of humor to the story as the seller of the titular merkin. As the case with most of the supporting cast, he enters and exits the story casually, only popping up to deliver more jokes.
As a comedy, The Foxy Merkins works part of the time. It is more constructed around the likability of its leads, and it manages to give the film enough weight to hold interest. Tonally, there are some problems with the consistency and some jokes are too monotonous. There isn’t too much to hate about the film, but it lacks focus in its overall message. It may hurt the film from feeling memorable, but with two good lead performances, it at least shows the promise of actors willing to elevate problematic material to something a little more interesting. (Thomas Willett, cinemabeach.com)

Effettua il login o registrati

Per poter completare l'azione devi essere un utente registrato.