BFFs

BFFs
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Cast

BFFs

Kat (Tara Karsian) festeggia il suo compleanno organizzato dai suoi amici e dalla mamma (Pat Carroll). C’è anche la sua migliore amica di sempre, Samantha (Andrea Grano). Tutti i dialoghi finiscono sul tema: “Com’ è possibile che Kat non sia ancora riuscita ad accalappiarsi un uomo?” Tutti le vogliono bene e tutti sembrano preoccuparsi del suo futuro, mamma in testa, soprattutto dopo l’ultimo fallimento della sua storia amorosa. Tra i regali di compleanno c’è anche una settimana benessere con terapie di coppie, sul tema “Closer to Closeness”. Sam convince Kat ad usare questa opportunità: c’è una splendida piscina e poi si potranno sentire storie interessanti. Possono andarci come coppia, benchè si ritengano entrambe etero non avranno difficoltà a stare insieme. Quando arrivano al Centro scoprono di essere state assegnate al gruppo ‘disturbo d’ansia sociale’ e Kat ritiene che Sam sia affetta da ninfomania. Le difficoltà di una coppia in crisi sono evidenti. I proprietari del Centro sono la coppia Jacqueline & Bob (Sigrid Thornton, Patrick O’Connor) molto delicati nell’approccio verso gli ospiti. Le altre coppie che fanno parte del gruppo sono JK & Jonah (l’attore gay dichiarato Sean Maher, Russell Sams), coppia gay indecisa su un’eventuale adozione; David & Rebecca (Dan Gauthier, Molly Hagan) in profonda crisi di accettazione reciproca; Scott & Chloe (Jeffrey Vincent Parise, Larisa Oleynik), i più divertenti, devono decidersi sul matrimonio; Suzie & Kent (Jenny O-Hara, Richard Moll), assidui frequentatori del Centro, apparentemente sempre nella fase luna di miele. Mentre procedono le storie delle varie coppie, che spesso arrivano a delle rotture, Kat & Samantha scoprono che i vari drammi a cui stanno assistendo hanno effetti sorprendenti anche su di loro, si sentono sempre più coinvolte, sentono che qualcosa sta accadendo nella loro relazione. Devono domandarsi se stanno ancora recitando o se invece sono veramente una coppia lesbica. E’ possibile che questo intenso weekend con coppie gay ed etero stia rivelando qualcosa che hanno ignorato per tanti anni?… La commedia si mantiene in un piacevole equilibrio tra ironia e serietà, con battute divertenti e intelligenti riflessioni sulle problematica di coppia e d’identità. Bravi tutti gli interpreti e ottime le due protagoniste, anche autrici della sceneggiatura.

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trailer: BFFs

Varie

Kat and Samantha have been best friends for years. W hen Samantha convinces a reluctant Kat to take advantage of a couple’s weekend retreat by pretending to be lovers, they’re hoping for some time by the pool and maybe a few good stories. How hard could it be? Instead, they find themselves immersed in an int ensive workshop with real couples who are fighting to save their relationships. As the “Closer to Closeness” weekend progresses, Kat and Samantha are made to face their own shortcomings and, by default, begin to believe their own cover story. When the line s of friendship begin to blur, they are faced with asking themselves: could it actually be there is something there or has this weekend just worked a Jedi mind trick on them?

CRITICA:

As in many a romantic comedy, the central couple in BFFs are the last to recognize that they just might be meant for each other. The twist — and it’s a fresh one — is that they’re straight women and longtime friends; they stumble upon the possibility of something deeper while pretending to be an item at a “healing retreat for couples” — or maybe they’ve just drunk the relationship Kool-Aid. Screenwriter-producers Tara Karsian and Andrea Grano, who also star as the should-they-or-shouldn’t-they duo, get a lot right in their gentle spoof of New Age California-speak, which had its world premiere at the Santa Barbara festival.
One of the things the writer-producers nab is the pervasiveness of passive-aggressive “concern” in contemporary conversation. In the opening scene, fortysomething Kat (Karsian) is the picture of misery at her birthday dinner, where her mother (comedy vet Pat Carroll) and an assortment of frenemies offer faux sympathy over her recently dashed engagement to be married, an event they consider the latest in a lifetime of relationship failures. Mom ups the ante with the gift of a weekend of couples counseling for Kat and her ex. A few tequilas later, Kat’s best friend, Samantha (Grano), convinces her that they should pose as a couple in order to enjoy the picturesque retreat’s pool and have a laugh or two.
The other five couples at the Closer to Closeness getaway, among them the “living example” retreat facilitators (Sigrid Thornton and Patrick O’Connor) and a young gay couple (Sean Maher, Russell Sams), are more sketched in than fully fleshed out. The most vividly realized supporting character is Richard Moll’s caricature of a self-realization enthusiast, a retirement-age man who seemingly has adopted New Age workshopping as a second career.
When, amid the group sharing, trust exercises and discussions of intimacy issues, the imposters start to feel something for each other, Grano and Karsian play the quandary just right, avoiding, as they do throughout the film, the forced, sitcommy delivery of many comedies.
Intriguing, if sometimes repetitive and thin, the low-budget production flirts with feel-good formula but wisely remains open-ended. Although director Andrew Putschoegl occasionally overindulges some of the story’s sincere therapeutic moments, for the most part he keeps things moving in the sunny, rustic-posh mountainside setting, maintaining a light tension between irony and earnestness.
In their observant writing and appealing performances, Karsian and Grano tap into something believable. Their characters bicker, joke and finish each other’s thoughts like any well-tuned partnership, trading insights, barbs and pointed looks — and indulging in a pitch-perfect game of “Who Would You Rather?” — with the natural rhythms of people who are smart, funny and in sync. (Sheri Linden, hollywoodreporter.com)

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